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  1. #1
    Junior Member win@anycost's Avatar
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    Default Hyper extended elbow

    I recently have hyper extended my elbow on numerous occasions in my thai boxing classes due to snapping my punches and a newbie partner moving the pads right before impact! Does anyone have any good advice for healing while im on my 2 week break from classes and training?

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    Super Moderator Jay Bell's Avatar
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    Strengthen your elbows. The "snap" of the elbow shouldn't cause injury like you described.

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    During the two weeks, ice, rest, and NSAIDs. Over the longer term, you are going to want to add in some resistance exercise. Ligaments and tendons are commonly referred to as "passive tissue" but that is hardly the reality. They have the ability to strengthen and adapt over time just like muscle. In addition, some recent research has indicated that certain proteins found in tendon and ligaments can be phosphorylated in the very short term as well and that this ability improves over time with training.

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    I should also add that it is entirely possible that you have something going on in your joint structure that allows you to move through range of motion that most people cannot. This could certainly contribute to your issues. Try the above and if it does not show results in 12 weeks or so, see an ortho and get it checked out.

    Good luck.
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  5. #5
    Junior Member win@anycost's Avatar
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    Well with my right cross I always twist my arm inward for more oooomph and reach so that may be why its more vounarable when I dont contact with it. And whats nsaids?

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    Super Moderator Jay Bell's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by win@anycost
    Well with my right cross I always twist my arm inward for more oooomph and reach so that may be why its more vounarable when I dont contact with it. And whats nsaids?
    Well...what that is saying is that you are putting more strain on that twist then the elbow is prepared for. Resistance training will help strengthen the tendons, helping to prevent that in the future.

    NSAID's are anti-inflammatory medicines.

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    Senior Member nismophreek's Avatar
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    NSAID- Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs...like ibuprofen (advil) and naproxen sodium (aleve)
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  8. #8
    Junior Member win@anycost's Avatar
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    Ok so Ive waited 2 weeks now and went back to my thai boxing classes and once again after class I have pain in my elbow. I think it is gonna take a while. I looked up some info on web MD and it says the symtoms are what they call "tennis elbow". It says I should take a 8-10 week break from activities! Bleh!! I cant do that. But anyway Should whey protien help promote healing? I think I can lift whieghts with out hurting it. So Im hoping that will work!



    This is off web MD.

    What is tennis elbow?

    “Tennis elbow” is a term that describes soreness or pain on the outer (lateral) part of the elbow. While tennis elbow is common, playing tennis is only one of many activities that can result in this tendon injury. Also called lateral epicondylitis, tennis elbow occurs when there is tendon damage at the elbow where some of the forearm and hand muscles connect to the upper arm bone. It affects the muscles you use when extending your wrist and fingers.

    See an illustration of tennis elbow.
    What causes tennis elbow?

    Frequent twisting movements of the hand, wrist or forearm usually cause tennis elbow. These are motions you use in everyday actions, such as using a screwdriver, digging in a garden, and playing racquet sports. A direct blow to the outer elbow can also cause tendon damage.

    Tennis elbow can also result from using the wrong type of sports equipment or improper technique. A tennis racquet with a grip too large for your hand can put a lot of pressure on your tendon. Hitting the ball late in your swing can also lead to tendon damage.

    Tennis elbow generally occurs in adults between the ages of 40 and 60 and is most common during the 40s.
    How is tennis elbow diagnosed?

    Your health professional can usually tell if tennis elbow is causing your elbow pain by learning the history of the elbow problem, your daily activities, and past injuries. You'll also have a physical exam.

    It’s unlikely that you'll have an X-ray to diagnose your elbow pain. However, if your symptoms don't get better with treatment, you may have imaging tests, such as X-ray, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), or bone scan. These tests will tell your doctor whether a bone problem or tissue damage is causing your symptoms.
    How is tennis elbow treated?

    Treatment for tennis elbow includes resting your arm to allow the tendon to heal and taking pain-relief medication. Surgery is seldom needed for tennis elbow.

    You may wear a forearm brace or sling for a few days. Applying cold or warmth may help ease pain and stiffness.1

    Once pain eases, a rehabilitation exercise program can help your arm mend, as well as prevent injury. These ongoing exercises work to make the muscles around the injured tendon stronger and more flexible. Changing or stopping activities that may have led to your injury is vitally important in the healing process.

    If your symptoms don't improve after 6 to 8 weeks of tendon rest and rehabilitation, your health professional might recommend a corticosteroid injection. This shot may give you weeks of short-term relief to allow you to start a rehabilitation program. Corticosteroids are known to weaken tendon tissue.2

    Patience is a key factor in successful treatment. A typical case of tennis elbow takes 6 to 12 months to heal. Most people recover within a year.2

  9. #9
    Moderator Emeritus TonyU's Avatar
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    I had tennis elbow or tendinitis in my right elbow, Now I have in the left. It took my right elbow over a year to heal. Why? For the same reasons you stated I couldn't stop training.
    I train and I train hard, I'm just limited to what I can do with the arm.
    Oh, ice and alot of ibuprofen helps.
    "Once a kata has been learned, it must be practiced repeatedly until it can be applied in an emergency, for knowledge of just the sequence of a form in Karate is useless.” –Gichin Funakoshi

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  10. #10
    Junior Member win@anycost's Avatar
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    Do you have a hard time lifting wheights at the gym or anything like that? What kind of limitations do you have?

  11. #11
    Moderator Emeritus TonyU's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by win@anycost
    Do you have a hard time lifting wheights at the gym or anything like that? What kind of limitations do you have?
    Sorry, I don't lift weights. I do perform certain conditioning and honjo undo (karate specifics strengthening exercises) and yes it place limitations.
    For example I have to limit the amount and how hard I hit the makiwara (striking post) with the injured arm.
    Lat night while I was doing my exercises I was also limited in how many knuckle pushups I was able to do. So I worked my lower body.
    You just have to learn to work other parts.
    When I fight I tend to forget until I throw a punch, but by then it's too late.
    Completely taking a break from training is out of the question for me, but that's just me.
    "Once a kata has been learned, it must be practiced repeatedly until it can be applied in an emergency, for knowledge of just the sequence of a form in Karate is useless.” –Gichin Funakoshi

    "The teacher is more important than the style."
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